Everyone that follows this blog in any capacity knows that I’m an enormous fan of niche blogging.  As I’ve become a better blogger, I’ve come to realize that there are times when it’s good to create a larger niche blog, and there are times when it’s good to create a smaller niche blog.  While this may seem obvious, I used to be really resistant to the idea of creating a micro-niche blog (I’m stubborn like that).

Regarding the latter, I’ve also come to realize that it’s important when to know when to let things go.  This is a hard thing for me to do because I’m one of those people that just loves to keep stuff forever.  When it comes to IM, we also know that we need content out there in order to make money.  While we also know that some sites can take off faster than others, there are times when you just need to let stuff go — even if you don’t have something to replace it at the time.

For me, I’ve come up with this policy (in my head) that says that if a site I create doesn’t make money within a year (how long I purchase my domain names for), I let the sites go — even if the sites are getting search engine traffic and clicks.  The truth is that, if you’re in a halfway-decent niche, you can find other things to promote down the line.

I’m sure some of you are thinking, “I wouldn’t do that because the site could eventually make a sale.”  This is true.  However, think about it this way.  If you purchase a domain for like $13 or $14 per year, but the site only makes one sale (average of about $30) over the course of that time frame, you’re basically just breaking even (if the person doesn’t refund).

The fastest I’ve ever made money from a micro-niche site (without a list) and from only search engine traffic is 12 days (still hoping to get this under a week).  I figure that the approach I’m taking allows me to become a more proficient marketer without causing me to waste too much money unnecessarily in the process.

Until next time..